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The Henry
Beaufort
School

Special Education Needs (SEN)

How does the school know if students need extra help with learning? 

The Henry Beaufort School is a mainstream school.  Achievement with care is our vision for all our students.  We aim to ensure that:

  • Students with learning difficulties are able to access their entitlement to a broad, balanced and relevant curriculum as part of the whole school community.
  • Students with SEND are educated, wherever possible, in an inclusive environment alongside their peers to enable each student to reach his or her full potential.
  • We match levels of additional support for learning to the wide variety of individual learning difficulties, while enhancing self-esteem.
  • We identify and assess students with SEND as early and as thoroughly as possible using the revised Code of Practice (2014).
  • Parents/carers and students are fully involved in the identification and assessment of SEND, and that we strive for close co-operation between all agencies concerned, using a multi-disciplinary approach.
  • We meet the needs of all students with SEN by offering appropriate and flexible forms of educational provision, by the most efficient use of all available resources.
  • We maintain up to date knowledge of current SEN good practice and methodology in order to offer support and training in these areas to all staff in the school.

There are four types of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), decided by the department for education:

  1. Communication and interaction
  2. Cognition and learning
  3. Social, mental and emotional health
  4. Sensory or physical

If a student has SEND, then their needs will fit into one or more of these categories.

A school’s provision for SEND is defined as support which is additional to or different from that which is available to all students. 

At Henry Beaufort School, we recognise that students make progress at different rates and not always in a steady linear pattern.  Therefore, students are identified as having SEND in a variety of ways, including the following:

  • Liaison with primary school/previous school
  • The student performing significantly below expected levels
  • Concerns raised by parent/carer
  • Concerns raised by teacher
  • Liaison with external agencies, e.g. physical health diagnosis from paediatrician

If a student is identified as having SEND then their name will be added to the SEN register, but we recognise that students’ needs may change over time and provision must reflect this.  The aim of any additional provision is for the student to achieve age expectations, so once they reach this threshold they may be removed from the school SEN register.  If they fall behind again at any point, then they may be added to the register again.

What should I do if I think my child has special educational needs? 

Your main point of contact at school should always be your child’s tutor.  You can start by contacting the tutor, who will be able to discuss your concerns.  If you need to speak with other staff members, such as Pastoral Leaders or the Learning Co-ordinator (SENCO), then the tutor will be able to help you arrange this. 

How will school support my child? 

Subject teachers are responsible for the progress of students in their lessons.  They are trained to teach children with all types of additional learning requirements and are responsible for making the curriculum accessible to all students.

The Learning Co-ordinator is responsible for ensuring that:

  • Teachers understand a student’s needs
  • Teachers are trained in meeting those needs
  • Teachers have support in planning to meet a student’s needs
  • The quality of teaching for students with SEND, and
  • Provision across the school is efficiently managed.

Sometimes, some students require additional support to make progress across the curriculum, because they are significantly below the expectations for their age.  Then, the Learning Co-ordinator is responsible for organising intervention for an individual or small group of students, which might include one of these provisions, for example:

  • Additional adult support in the classroom – departments have Learning Support Assistants (LSAs) who support the teacher in helping the learning of whole classes; the Learning Co-ordinator also is able to direct a limited amount of ‘hours’ of additional adult support in the classroom, in cases where there is evidence that students are significantly below the expectations for their age
  • Withdrawal sessions – when students comes out of some lessons for pre-arranged sessions with LSAs on, for example, handwriting, reading, numeracy, study skills, organisation skills, social skills, etc.
  • Disapplication – if long-term intervention is needed, a student can sometimes be disapplied from a subject on the national curriculum, in order to allow time for intensive support with learning
  • Skills Base – a specially designed Transition Curriculum for students joining Y7 who are not yet secondary ready and who have literacy and numeracy skills below level 4

Hearing Impaired Resourced Base
In addition, the school has a resourced provision for hearing impaired students.  Led by a Teacher of the Deaf, support is tailored to meet the individual needs of each student which may include specialist in class support (provided by learning support and Communication Support Assistants) and/or individual specialist teaching in the Centre (including from our Deaf Instructor).  Our staff are experienced in working with both oral and signing students.

  • The Centre comprises of a suite of rooms including three tutorial rooms and an audiology room.  It is a purpose built facility which was specially designed and acoustically treated to enable students to work in a quiet area and develop their speech and listening skills.  
  • Every hearing impaired student within the Centre has a personal up to date radio aid system to provide maximum access to the curriculum and to enhance their listening experience in mainstream classes.
  • All staff at the school are trained in teaching and working with hearing impaired students.
  • Admission to the resourced provision is determined by Hampshire County Council.
Home learning

The home learning set by teachers is an integral part of students’ learning and can contribute directly to how well a student makes progress.  Home learning consolidates and builds on the learning in lessons, ensuring that students fully understand concepts and apply skills they have learnt.  The school expects parents to engage with their child’s home learning, so that students can see the high value their parents place on working as part of a home-school partnership.  This provides essential support for teachers and means no opportunity is lost for supporting every student’s learning.

Who will explain provision to me?
  • Information about the provision in individual subjects can be discussed with subject teachers or academic leaders.  There is an annual opportunity for this at parents’ evening, but teachers can meet with parents/carers at any point in the school year to discuss students’ progress.
  • In the case of individual or small group interventions, the Learning Co-ordinator or Senior LSA will write to parents/carers explaining the aims of the intervention.  Letters, phone-calls or emails will be used to keep parents/carers updated on their child’s progress and discuss support in more detail, if required.
  • The Teacher of the Deaf will also use letters, phone-calls, emails or meetings to keep parents/carers updated on their child’s progress and to discuss support in more detail, if required, in relation to hearing impaired students within the provision.  

How are the school governors involved and what are their responsibilities? 

  • The Learning Co-ordinator and Teacher of the Deaf report to the governors annually to inform them about the progress of students with SEND; this report does not refer to individual students and confidentiality is maintained at all times.
  • One of the governors is responsible for SEN and meets with the Learning Co-ordinator and Teacher of the Deaf. This ‘SEN link governor’ also reports to the governing committees, to keep all the governors informed. 

How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs? What are the school’s approaches to differentiation and how will that help my child? 

Subject teachers are responsible for planning lessons that are accessible to and differentiated for every student.  In some curriculum areas (English, maths and science) students are grouped by levels of attainment, whilst other curriculum areas are taught in mixed attainment groups.  Students are entitled to participate in all areas of the curriculum and it is the subject teacher’s role to differentiate resources and activities to ensure the student can access the learning.  This can mean teachers plan:

  • Visual, auditory or kinaesthetic activities
  • Small group or 1-1 learning with an LSA
  • Pre-teaching content or vocabulary
  • Over-learning topics
  • To set alternative activities for home learning
  • To provide specially targeted texts and resources appropriate for students’ reading ages
  • To provide additional apparatus or materials
  • To adapt and adjust resources and materials to make them accessible for students with specific learning difficulties

At Key Stage 4 (year 9 onwards) students choose from a range of GCSE, BTEC and vocational courses, which help to prepare them for the next steps in their education, be that college, apprenticeships or work.  Students and parents/carers are offered advice and careers guidance at the appropriate time to help make these important decisions.

There is a free whole school Home Learning Club available to all students, every day (Monday-Thursday until 5pm, Friday until 4.30pm) where students can seek help from a member of staff and trained sixth-form students from Peter Symonds College.  Parents/carers can speak to their child’s tutor for more information about Home Learning Club.

For students with SEND, there is a separate Home Learning Club, which is much smaller and staffed by LSAs, so that students can receive more targeted help and staff can differentiate materials to support the student in accessing the curriculum.  This club is by invitation only and parents/carers can contact the Learning Co-ordinator for more information about this.

For students within the Hearing Impaired resourced provision, home learning can be worked on after school within the Centre, supported by the LSAs and CSAs within the Team.  The specially designed tutorial rooms within the Centre are also used for withdrawal from mainstream lesson possible for individual hearing impaired students or groups of students when applicable.  One to one tutorials allow for preparation and reinforcement of the curriculum as well as the development of literacy, vocabulary and communication skills.

How will I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child’s learning? What opportunities will there be for me to discuss my child’s progress? 

We offer an open door policy where parents/carers are welcome any time to make an appointment to meet with either a subject teacher or tutor or any other teacher, and discuss how their child is progressing.  Parents/carers can contact staff members directly by email or by writing a note in their child’s planner, or through the school office: admin@staff.beaufort.hants.sch.uk or 01962 880073

Planned arrangements for communicating between school and home include:
  • Every student has a school planner/handbook, which travels between home and school every day so that so that comments from parents/carers and teachers or tutors can be shared and responded to as needed
  • Each year group has at least one parents’ evening each year, when all subject teachers are available to meet with parents/carers and discuss progress and learning
  • Each year group has a report programme, which includes one progress check (current levels of attainment) and one tutor, pastoral leader and head teacher report (alongside current levels of attainment).  These are sent home to parents/carers and provide a basis for discussion about progress in different subject areas
  • If your child has an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) or Statement of SEN, then there are legal requirements for at least one formal meeting each year (the Annual Review) organised by the Learning Co-ordinator (or Teacher of the Deaf if relevant) and attended by parents/carers, teachers and outside agencies involved in the student’s education. 

How does the school know how well my child is doing? 

Teachers, as part of their professional standards, monitor and review all students’ progress throughout the year.  The whole school system at Henry Beaufort includes:

  • Data collection each half term, from all teachers, showing the current level of attainment of all the students they teach.  This means that teachers and academic leaders in each subject area can track the progress of students across the school year and intervene if students experience difficulties.
  • In the case of intervention programmes, progress is reviewed every half term, which might include testing or screening.  These programmes are reviewed by the Learning Co-ordinator and two Senior LSAs, who use the information to plan and design the next half term’s intervention programme.
  • In-class additional support is reviewed weekly at the Additional Learning Team meetings (and by the Hearing Impaired Team), and at monthly department meetings.  LSAs, CSAs and teachers work together on a day-to-day basis, planning and reviewing lessons.
  • Teachers are observed by senior leaders and line managers as part of the school Managing Performance and Progress system; the deployment of additional adults in the classroom and the progress of students with additional learning requirements are part of the Teacher Standards, against which the quality of teaching is measured.
  • The Deputy Head Teacher is responsible for whole school data and tracks the school’s progress against national standards.  This provides guidance for academic leaders when planning the curriculum and additional support for students.
  • At the start of Y7 and the end of Y9, students are screened for reading, spelling and maths skills.  This allows us to identify when students may need further support, intervention, or additional assessment to detect any underlying difficulties.
  • The school positive behaviour management system (stamps) provides parents/carers with information about how well a student is engaging with the learning opportunities on offer, and provides pastoral staff with evidence for how well a student is learning at school.

What support will there be for my child’s overall well being? What is the pastoral, medical and social support available in the school? 

The school uses a positive behaviour management system.  Every lesson, every student will receive a stamp from the teacher for abiding by the five golden rules:

  1. Behaviour
  2. Punctuality
  3. Equipment
  4. Instructions
  5. Targets and/or home learning

Stamps are monitored by tutors and are linked to rewards such as the right to participate in the yearly Enrichment Week or to attend the Leavers’ Ball.  This enables the pastoral team to identify students who are falling behind their peers, to investigate and to address the reasons for this.

Henry Beaufort operates a vertical tutoring system, which means that students are placed with students from every year group for their tutor group.  This encourages community cohesion, communication across age groups and opportunities for mentoring and leadership.  This system also means that students are able to share their experiences and provide support for students experiencing the same changes and transitions that they have already faced.  Tutors are the main point of contact for parents/carers about their child’s pastoral and social well-being.

We have a small team of ELSAs (Emotional Literacy Support Assistants) who have been trained by and receive regular supervision support from Hampshire Educational Psychology Service.  The Learning Co-ordinator arranges this provision and pastoral leaders can request this support for their students, when they consider it to be suitable.  The areas of emotional difficulties that ELSAs provide for are:  specified social skills; friendships and relationships; anger management; loss and change; self-organisation.

Students who struggle with social situations are provided with a choice of quiet spaces to go during lunchtimes, break times and before school, where they are supported by LSAs to manage unstructured social time.

If a student is unwell during the school day, then they will be sent to the Student Services room, which is run by the Student Welfare Officer.  If the student is too ill to stay at school, their parent/carer will be contacted and asked to make arrangements for collecting them as soon as possible.  The Student Welfare Officer will decide if the student is well enough to stay at school or not. 

In a medical emergency, the Student Welfare Officer will attend urgently, or may call for an ambulance if the student requires hospitalisation.  All staff are trained annually on administering Epi-Pens for anaphylactic shock, and students who have severe allergies or other significant health/medical needs are flagged-up to all staff throughout the school year.

The resourced provision supports the hearing impaired students’ personal, social and emotional wellbeing, led by the Teacher of the Deaf who sees all students on a daily basis.  The deaf instructor delivers a programme which enables students to explore their deaf identity and develop their confidence and self- esteem and there is peer support from the other students.  There are opportunities to take part in a range of events organised by both local and national deaf organisations and there is an annual school celebration of Deaf Awareness Week.

How does the school manage the administration of medicines? 

Medicines for students are managed by the Student Welfare Officer, from the Student Services room.  If a student requires medicine during the school day, the following procedures must be followed:

  • All medicines must be given in person to the Student Welfare Officer by a parent/carer
  • The student’s name and date of birth are recorded alongside the date, time, name of medicine, and dosage
  • Depending on how the medicine needs to be stored, it will be kept in either a locked cupboard or a fridge in the Student Services Room
  • To take their medicine, the student must go the Student Services room, where the dose will be administered by the Student Welfare Officer
  • Each time the medicine is administered, the time, date and dosage is recorded. 

What support is there for behaviour, avoiding exclusion and increasing attendance? 

The school uses a positive behaviour management system.  Every lesson, every student will receive a stamp from the teacher for abiding by the five golden rules:

  1. Behaviour
  2. Punctuality
  3. Equipment
  4. Instructions
  5. Targets and/or home learning

Stamps are monitored by tutors and are linked to rewards such as the right to participate in the yearly Enrichment Week or to attend the Leavers’ Ball.  This enables the pastoral team to identify students who are falling behind their peers, to investigate and to address the reasons for this.

There are consequences for poor behaviour, which are outlined in the school behaviour policy.  As well as losing rewards, students can receive sanctions such as detention, isolation or fixed term exclusions.

However, if a student is falling significantly behind their peers, and their behaviour is affecting their learning or the learning of others, then additional support may be provided.

  • The Family Support Worker helps parents/carers manage their child’s attendance at school and can support with outside agencies coming into school.
  • The Attendance Manager works with a number of Winchester schools to monitor attendance; oversee legal action against parents/carers whose children do not attend school; and, to help liaise with outside agencies who can support families in difficult situations.
  • The Social Inclusion Officer works with students when their learning is affected by their behaviour; providing emotional support, sign-posting to sources of guidance and advice, liaising with external agencies, overseeing education plans and arranging workshops/lessons about emotional, social and mental health.
  • The Learning Mentor works with students whose behaviour is affecting the learning of other students, to help them develop skills for understanding and managing their emotional, social and mental health for supporting learning at school; by providing education plans and arranging workshops/lessons.
  • The ‘CUBE’ (Collating our Understanding of Behaviour and Emotions) is an office staffed by an LSA who works to gather information about students and behavioural incidents that helps us understand the causes and factors involved.  Pastoral leaders, senior leaders and the Learning Mentor or Social Inclusion Officer use the information to plan interventions, design workshops or lessons, and to decide on sanctions for rule-breaking.

How will my child be able to contribute their views? 

Students’ views are highly valued at the school and their opinions are sought on many areas of school life, as well as their own learning.  We use a variety of methods for seeking student views:

  • The school has an active student council, where students are elected each year to represent their peers in their teams.  The student council is consults on whole school plans, leads on charity activities at school and is able to express student views to senior leaders throughout the school year.
  • Student panels regularly form a part of the school’s interview process for new members of staff.
  • There is an annual pupil questionnaire where we actively seek the viewpoints of students on a range of topics.  The results of this questionnaire are used by the Senior Leadership Team to develop the whole school improvement plan.
  • Students leaving the school are offered the chance to complete an exit questionnaire, which asks for their views on their experience at school and their suggestions for changes to improve or develop student experiences.
  • The HB2 learning group, which is made up of student representatives, meet regularly to explore different approaches to learning across the school and to plan ways of improving students’ learning using the HB2 (Henry Beaufort Habit Building) approach.
  • If a student takes part in an intervention programme, then they will contribute their views to the half-termly review of progress.
  • If your child has an EHCP or Statement of SEND, their views will be sought before any review meetings.

What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school? 

The Learning Co-ordinator (Rachael Godlement) is a fully qualified and accredited SENCO, and liaises with many specialist services and outside experts, to ensure provision for our students is appropriate and meets all needs.  The school works closely with any external agencies that are relevant to individual students’ needs, including:

  • Health – GPs, school nurse, clinical psychologists and psychiatrists (CAMHS), paediatricians, speech & language therapists, occupational therapists
  • Social services – locality teams, social workers, child protection teams, family intervention programmes
  • Hampshire Educational Psychology Service
  • Hampshire Inspectorate and Advisory Service : Specialist Teacher Advisors – hearing impairment, physical disabilities, communication and language, SEND team

The Teacher of the Deaf (Alison Strevens) is a qualified specialist.  The resourced provision has close working relations with the University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service.  Students access NHS speech and language therapy sessions delivered within the Centre.

What SEND training have the staff had or are currently having? 

SEND training is an on-going rolling programme of professional development for our staff, throughout the school year.

  • We have a small team of ELSAs (Emotional Literacy Support Assistants) who have been trained by and receive regular supervision support from Hampshire Educational Psychology Service.
  • Two senior LSAs have extensive experience and training in planning, delivering and assessing intervention programmes.
  • All staff are trained each year on the needs of new students joining the school – this can include training from specialist agencies or consultants, as well as from the Learning Co-ordinator or other staff with relevant expertise.
  • SEND training forms part of the continuing professional development of all teachers and LSAs and is organised in accordance with the needs of the students.
  • The school works closely with other local schools, especially our feeder primary school, sharing training opportunities including INSET days and outside experts.  Opportunities to develop this aspect of local expertise are actively sought throughout the school year.
  • A working party for staff from across the curriculum, and led by the Learning Co-ordinator, meets at least once per half term to review and plan the training, guidance and advice that staff across the school need to ensure they meet the additional learning requirements of our students.
  • The Hearing Impaired resource provision is led by a qualified Teacher of the Deaf.  The Team is comprised of experienced learning support and Communication Support Assistants (minimum BSL Level 3) and a Deaf Instructor.  All staff within the team receive professional updates from organisations such as the local Implant Service as well as joint training with SEND colleagues within the school, depending on the students’ individual needs.   
  • All staff at the school are trained in teaching and working with hearing impaired students, with updates at Induction and INSET days.

How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips? 

All students are entitled to be included in all parts of the school curriculum and we aim for all students to be included on school trips. We will provide the necessary support to ensure that this is successful.

A risk assessment is carried out prior to any off-site activity to ensure everyone’s health and safety will not be compromised.  This may include specialist advice from the Teacher of the Deaf, where relevant.  In the unlikely event that it is considered unsafe for a student to take part in an activity, then alternative activities which will cover the same curriculum areas will be provided in school. 

Students within the resourced provision are encouraged to participate in a range of activities organised by local and national deaf organisations.

How accessible is the school environment? 

  • The school site is positioned on a hill, which means there are many steps.  Additionally, two of the teaching blocks (Warsaw – science, and Berlin/Luxembourg – humanities/languages) have stairs but no lift.  The Beacon Arts Centre also has stairs to the first floor but does have lift access.
  • The site has recently been adapted so that all areas can be reached via permanent ramps, meaning that the ground floors of all buildings are accessible for wheelchair users or those with impaired mobility.
  • The site has two disabled toilets large enough to accommodate changing in the Prague – English block.
  • There are two car parks on site – one at the top of the hill and one at the bottom.  Both car parks have parking bays for disabled badge holders, marked clearly in yellow paint .
  • We liaise with HEMTAS (Hampshire Ethnic Minority and Traveller Advisory Service) who assist us in supporting families with English as an additional language or with a Traveller background.
  • Hearing Impaired have a purpose built facility which was specially designed and acoustically treated to enable students to work in a quiet area and develop their speech and listening skills.  This comprises of a suite of eight rooms including three tutorial rooms and an audiology room.

How will the school prepare and support my child when joining the school and transferring to a new school? 

Our goal is to make sure our new students feel like they belong at Henry Beaufort before they officially arrive.  Learning is most effective when students feel they belong and are comfortable in the school environment.

Key Stage 2-3 (year 6 to year 7)
  • Through the school’s ‘Primary Pyramid’, careful transition is planned and arranged.  The Learning Co-ordinator, Teacher of the Deaf, Senior LSAs and Transition Curriculum teachers work closely with primary schools to organise activities, visits and experience of secondary life for those students who are especially vulnerable at transition.
  • All students in year 6 who have accepted a place at Henry Beaufort for year 7 are invited to two intake days in June.  These days provide a taste of secondary school life, involve experience of lessons, information about how the school runs and provide an opportunity for students to meet their new classmates.  Hearing Impaired students are invited to further days at the school during the Summer Term, as determined by the students needs.   
  • Parents/carers are invited to an ‘Intake Evening’ at the end of the two intake days, to learn about the activities their children have undertaken, to meet key members of the pastoral team and to receive information about the organisation of the school.
  • The Learning-Coordinator visits feeder primary schools to meet students, gather information from year 6 teachers and support staff and to offer informal ‘question and answer’ sessions for parents/carers.  (Contact your child’s primary school to find out about the arrangements made with Henry Beaufort for the current academic year).
  •  The Teacher of the Deaf will visit individual students within their primary school, to obtain further information from teachers/support staff and to see students in more familiar surroundings.  There will be extensive liaision with the students’ current Teachers of the Deaf.  
  • Henry Beaufort teachers are provided with information about all new students’ needs, strengths and background before the end of year 6.  
  • Henry Beaufort operates a vertical tutoring system, which means that students are placed with others from every year group for their tutor group.  This encourages community cohesion, communication across age groups and opportunities for mentoring and leadership.  This system also means that students are able to share their experiences and provide support for students experiencing the same changes and transitions that they have already faced.  Additionally, tutors welcome only five or six new students to their tutor group each year, meaning that the students are well known in school very quickly.  The Learning Co-ordinator allocates Y6 students to tutor groups according to advice from the primary school.
  • The first day of the new school year in September is known as ‘Learning Day’ and is for year 10 and year 7 students only.  On this day, students learn together about how to be effective learners and reflect on their own skills.
  • Every student’s school file is passed on to the Pastoral Leader, (or, in the case of students with SEND, the Learning Co-ordinator) at the start of year 7.
  • During the first week of the new school year, parents/carers of new year 7 students are invited to meet with the child’s tutor, to introduce themselves, share information and establish contact with the school.
  • The school arranges regular transition groups and visits for vulnerable year 6 students to get to know the school site, meet staff with whom they will work and learn about how the school is organised.  These are designed each year to meet the students’ needs, but typically involve: fortnightly afternoon group activities; experience ‘shadowing’ year 7 students; tours; and, informal gatherings for students and parents.  (Parents/carers can contact their child’s primary school for more information about this programme).
  • Each year, a small number of year 7 students arrive at Henry Beaufort who are not secondary ready, or who are below level 4 for literacy and numeracy.  For these students, we have a specially designed Transition Curriculum.  (For more information, please contact the Learning Co-ordinator at school).
Key Stage 3-4 (year 8 to year 9)
  • At Henry Beaufort we have had a short KS2 (year 7 and year 8 only) and a longer KS4 (year 9 onwards) for many years.  This is so that our students have more time to spend on developing the skills and knowledge required for achieving qualifications at the end of year 11.
  • For KS4, students choose from a range of GCSE, BTEC and vocational courses, which help to prepare them for the next steps in their education, be that college, apprenticeships or work.  Students and parents/carers are offered advice and careers guidance at the appropriate time to help make these important decisions.
  • There are opportunities for some students to attend local colleges on a part time basis during Years 10 and 11, to follow a vocational course as part of their timetable.
  • Henry Beaufort operates a vertical tutoring system, which means that students are placed with others from every year group for their tutor group.  This encourages community cohesion, communication across age groups and opportunities for mentoring and leadership.  This system also means that students are able to share their experiences and provide support for students experiencing the same changes and transitions that they have already faced.
KS4-5 (year 11 to year 12)
  • The school arranges visits to open days and further education fairs for all students.  Support with finding and applying for apprenticeships is also available.
  • Students are encouraged to consider attending university in the future and the school works with higher education establishments to provide experiences for students to inspire the ambition to pursue this route.
  • All students in year 11 are provided with 1-1 careers advice to help them plan possible routes for training or education.
  • Students with a Statement of SEN or an EHCP who are moving on to further education are supported by the county’s Youth Support Services.  A youth support worker will attend all Annual Reviews from Y9 onwards to help plan and organise support for the move to college or vocational training.
  • The Additional Learning Team and Hearing Impaired Team liaise closely with local colleges about individual students with SEND.  This liaison is arranged in accordance with the student’s needs, but typically can include: extra visits or tours; an opportunity to ‘shadow’ a year 12 student; meetings with college support staff; or, guidance and advice on meeting the student’s needs for college staff.
  • All information relating to a student’s exam concessions and required differentiation is passed on to college or training provider during the summer term of year 11, when college places have been confirmed.
Joining mid-year
  • All students admitted to the school after the start of the academic year are screened on entry, to identify any areas of need and to provide information to staff about the student’s learning
  • A student ‘buddy’ is chosen to support the new student for the first few days of being at Henry Beaufort.  The buddy takes the new student to lessons, introduces them to other students, answers questions and informs pastoral staff how well the new student is settling in to school
  • Contact is always made with the previous school to ensure the transfer of information and the child’s school file.
Moving to another school
  • Contact is always made with the new school to ensure the transfer of information and the child’s school file.

How are the school’s resources allocated and matched to children’s needs? 

We ensure that all students with SEND have their needs met to the best of the school’s ability, within the funds available.

The budget is allocated on a needs basis. The students who have the most complex needs are given the most support.

The school has a specially resourced base for students with hearing impairments, which is funded by the local authority and admits students on specific admission criteria.  For more information, contact the Teacher of the Deaf who runs the base: alison.strevens@staff.beaufort.hants.sch.uk

How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive? 

Our provision is arranged to meet our students’ needs, within the resources available.  This approach reflects the fact that different students require different levels of support in order to achieve age expected attainment.

The Learning Co-ordinator and the Teacher of the Deaf consult with subject teachers, academic leaders and pastoral leaders, as well as with support staff, to discuss the student’s needs and what support would be appropriate.

There are always on-going discussions with parents/carers for any student who requires additional support for their learning.

How do we know if it has had an impact? 

  • We see evidence that the student is making progress academically against national/age expected levels and that the gap is narrowing – they are catching up to their peers or expected age levels
  • The student is achieving or exceeding their expected levels of progress
  • Verbal feedback from the teacher, parent and student
  • Formal or informal observations of the student at school
  • Students may move off of the SEND register when they have ‘caught up’ or made sufficient progress.

Who can I contact for further information? 

  • A parent/carer’s first point of contact should be the child’s tutor to share concerns
  • Parents/carers can also arrange to meet the Learning Co-ordinator (Rachael Godlement) or Teacher of the Deaf (Alison Strevens): admin@beaufort.hants.sch.uk or 01962 880073

Additionally, the school liaises with and can refer parents/carers to the following agencies for information and support:

Who should I contact if I am considering whether my child should join the school? 

Contact the school admin office to arrange to meet a member of the Senior Leadership Team, the Learning Co-ordinator (Rachael Godlement) or Teacher of the Deaf (Alison Strevens): admin@beaufort.hants.sch.uk or 01962 880073